The Fault in Our Stars - by John Green
The Fault in Our Stars

"Green introduces us to characters who are asking big questions and dealing with big issues."


About halfway through John Green’s latest novel, The Fault in Our Stars, Hazel says, “You have a choice in this world, I believe, about how to tell sad stories, and we made the funny choice,” (209). John Green makes this same choice as he introduces us to a group of teenagers dealing with cancer. When the novel opens, we learn that Hazel Grace Lancaster was diagnosed at age 13 with stage 4 thyroid cancer that had spread to her lungs. She is now 16 years old, thanks to a miracle drug that is managing her cancer growth.

Hazel, who prefers hanging out at home with her parents and watching marathons of Americas Next Top Model and Top Chef, is forced to go to Support Group meetings for kids who have cancer. Her mother believes this will help her make friends and relieve her depression. Hazel hates Support Group, calling it “depressing as hell,” but goes each week to appease her mother. At one of these horrible meetings, Hazel encounters Augustus Waters. Augustus had osteosarcoma, but has been cancer free for a year and a half when he shows up at Support Group with his friend Isaac, who has eye cancer. Augustus, who stares at Hazel throughout Support Group, is witty and smart and as Hazel says, really really hot. Immediately drawn to one another, they begin a relationship. They share their favorite books with each other, Augustus’ about his favorite video game, Hazel’s about a girl with cancer. Augustus begins to share Hazel’s obsession about her book and its reclusive author. Both want to know more about what happens to the characters after the novel ends, and together they take a journey to discover what happened after.

Hazel Grace Lancaster is intelligent, witty, and sarcastic. John Green allows us to see Hazel as she grapples with dying from cancer and living her life. Hazel is the perfect narrator of this story, a mix of hilarious, emotional, and sassy. We glimpse her physical and emotional pain, but also get to fall in love with Augustus as she does.  Augustus, who maybe has a little more swagger than the other teenagers in support group because he is healthy when they are not, sweeps Hazel off her feet with planned romantic gestures, but also with his enthusiasm for having a life outside of having cancer. 


The Fault in Our Stars features teenagers with cancer, but it is ultimately about much more. Hazel and Augustus are forced to deal with loss, and John Green introduces us to characters that are asking big questions and dealing with big issues. When Augustus and Hazel first meet, he tells the support group his biggest fear is oblivion. He fears being forgotten after he is gone. This book asks the question, is it possible to have a full life if you do not get a long life? Hazel and Augustus are marked with an expiration date on their relationship. They explore whether or not it is possible to be happy, when you know it is going to end. 

Though The Fault in Our Stars deals with an arguable weightier topic than his other novels, Green continues to create characters who are funny. Hazel and Augustus make jokes about everything from the misuse of the word “literally” to jokes about their own illnesses. John Green does not lose the humor that shows up in his other books in this one. 

As previously stated, this book is not solely about children dealing with cancer. It is also about falling in love and having a life in the midst of loss. This book will make you cry, but it will also make you laugh and allow you to feel the excitement of falling in love. John Green creates characters that you can empathize and identify with as a boy or a girl. As he has said, he likes to make you feel all the things. And this book does.

    - Megan C.



"Green's writing bursts with intelligence mixed with tragic and lovely humor."


After living with cancer for three years, Hazel Grace Lancaster appears depressed, which she says is a side effect of dying, not of cancer. Still, her mother convinces her to attend Cancer Kid Support Group, where she meets Augustus Waters, a charming boy about her age who vibrates with life. They become quick friends, entangling themselves in each other’s short infinities.

This is not a cancer book. (Or maybe it is—depends on your definition.) This is a book about a girl with a striking wit and terminal cancer. This is a book about how two people—a boy and a girl—deal with where their stars rest, how they fall, and where they cross. This is a book about life and death and love and metaphors.

John Green says he likes to write a book if he thinks it’s a gift, and this book, I believe, is a gift. If you’re a fan of his other books (Looking for Alaska, An Abundance of Katherines, Paper Towns, etc.), you’ll enjoy The Fault in Our Stars. His characters have his trademark cleverness, and his writing bursts with intelligence mixed with tragic and lovely humor, seamlessly jelling the story together. Some have their complaints, of course, but I found the reading experience touching and beautiful, like bittersweet chocolate and sticky honey. I wanted to reread it as soon as I turned the last page.

    - Haley P.



"this book will inspire you to alter the way you live"


The Fault in Our Stars by John Green is by far the best book I have ever read. It is about a young girl, Hazel Grace, who's diagnosed with terminal lung cancer at the ripe old age of 15. She goes to a support group, which she dislikes, to help cope with her disease. The only good thing about her support group is this boy with a glass eye named Isaac. One day Isaac brings a friend to the group named Augustus Waters, who has been cancer free for a while, he has a prosthetic leg because he lost his previous leg to cancer. You could say he lost the battle but won the war. He is there to support Isaac; he doesn't need the support him self. Augustus and Hazel look at each other throughout the dull lecture of the leader's fight with testicular cancer. After class they talk to each other and she decides she likes him. Until he goes outside and puts a cigarette in his mouth, which really turns her off since cigarettes cause cancer, and she has lung cancer, especially since he's already won his first fight with cancer.

This book will make you laugh, then make you cry, and above all inspire you to alter the way you live. John Greene knows exactly how to play with your emotions and get you to fall in love with his characters. Green was a student chaplain in a children's hospital while enrolled at the University of Chicago's Divinity School. His experience in this field inspired him to write The Fault in Our Stars. Augustus and Hazel are very unique; they look at the world differently. They both enjoy reading and share books with each other. One book particularly inspires them, because it has no ending; it just stops. They don't know what happens to the characters and so they make it their mission to find out.

This book had a huge affect on me. I struggled to finish reading it because I had to fight off the constant tears. This book made me pray that cancer never affects me or anyone I care about. I became extremely depressed and barely managed to make it to the end, but it was still inspirational. I saw a lot of my life in The Fault in Our Stars. The relationship between Augustus and Hazel grace reminded me a lot of the relationship between me and my girl friend. I could feel the love in the book. I imagined myself in each of Hazel's and Augustus's positions and how difficult it would be for each of them. The Fault in Our Stars really affected me and inspired me to change myself for the better. It breaks the stereotype of most love stories with the adventure these two characters take in their battles with love and cancer.

John Green uses his writing skills to pull the feelings of young readers out from inside them and let them express them. I'm addicted to John Green's writings; I really liked Looking for Alaska too. This book was great and I highly recommend it to anybody dealing with cancer or that has a loved one dealing to cancer, or even just anyone who is looking for a good book to read. John Green knows how to write, and he will inspire you. I never read until my teacher recommended this book; maybe you'll read this and start reading just like me.

    - Ben R.



"this book will inspire you to alter the way you live"


The Fault in Our Stars by John Green is by far the best book I have ever read. It is about a young girl, Hazel Grace, who's diagnosed with terminal lung cancer at the ripe old age of 15. She goes to a support group, which she dislikes, to help cope with her disease. The only good thing about her support group is this boy with a glass eye named Isaac. One day Isaac brings a friend to the group named Augustus Waters, who has been cancer free for a while, he has a prosthetic leg because he lost his previous leg to cancer. You could say he lost the battle but won the war. He is there to support Isaac; he doesn't need the support him self. Augustus and Hazel look at each other throughout the dull lecture of the leader's fight with testicular cancer. After class they talk to each other and she decides she likes him. Until he goes outside and puts a cigarette in his mouth, which really turns her off since cigarettes cause cancer, and she has lung cancer, especially since he's already won his first fight with cancer.

This book will make you laugh, then make you cry, and above all inspire you to alter the way you live. John Greene knows exactly how to play with your emotions and get you to fall in love with his characters. Green was a student chaplain in a children's hospital while enrolled at the University of Chicago's Divinity School. His experience in this field inspired him to write The Fault in Our Stars. Augustus and Hazel are very unique; they look at the world differently. They both enjoy reading and share books with each other. One book particularly inspires them, because it has no ending; it just stops. They don't know what happens to the characters and so they make it their mission to find out.

This book had a huge affect on me. I struggled to finish reading it because I had to fight off the constant tears. This book made me pray that cancer never affects me or anyone I care about. I became extremely depressed and barely managed to make it to the end, but it was still inspirational. I saw a lot of my life in The Fault in Our Stars. The relationship between Augustus and Hazel grace reminded me a lot of the relationship between me and my girl friend. I could feel the love in the book. I imagined myself in each of Hazel's and Augustus's positions and how difficult it would be for each of them. The Fault in Our Stars really affected me and inspired me to change myself for the better. It breaks the stereotype of most love stories with the adventure these two characters take in their battles with love and cancer.

John Green uses his writing skills to pull the feelings of young readers out from inside them and let them express them. I'm addicted to John Green's writings; I really liked Looking for Alaska too. This book was great and I highly recommend it to anybody dealing with cancer or that has a loved one dealing to cancer, or even just anyone who is looking for a good book to read. John Green knows how to write, and he will inspire you. I never read until my teacher recommended this book; maybe you'll read this and start reading just like me.

    - Ben R.



"Their love is unpredictable, true, tragic, beautiful, and encouraging."


The Fault in our Stars is one of the best books I‘ve ever read. John Green, who writes wonderfully about love, hope and tragedy in this novel about Hazel, a girl who has cancer in her lungs. Hazel, a homebody who's obsessed with the book An Imperial Affiliation, meets this guy at cancer support group one night whose name is Augustus. He invites her over and they trade their favorite books and fall madly in love. They bond over the two novels, creating an intellectual and uncontrollable romance. They both know that their time is limited, so they love like crazy. Their love is unpredictable, true, tragic, beautiful, and encouraging. I think it's the kind of love that everyone wants. The kind where you can be yourself without worrying about what anyone thinks, where you're so involved in one another that you don't even notice what's going on around you.

The book is great because it has a sob story that keeps you reading until you finish, but the story line is also very unpredictable, which I like because so many "chick-flicky" books today have the same plot. I couldn't put it down! I loved the author's style of writing because it was actually how teenagers talk today, making it a quick read. I also liked how he used all caps sometimes to stress the importance of some parts. I think the book is very well written, in its way of relating to a teenager, and having an amazing plot that's easy to follow. John Green chooses intellectual, humorous, and powerful diction taking you on an unforgettable journey through their happy and sad lives.

My favorite line from the whole book is, "…while the world wasn't made for humans, we were made for the world…" I think that this quote is so true. We're supposed to go explore the world and find new things, adventure, be creative with nature, learn, have life changing and unregretful experiences, and live while we're young. The world is waiting to be found, we just have to go out there and do it. The book really puts you in the mindset of questioning yourself, "if I died tomorrow, would I have made an impact?" It really makes you think.

I don't want to spoil the book for anyone, but I cried in multiple places throughout the book. You will definitely need a box of tissues. You feel a true connection to the characters, like they are your best friends and you just HAVE to know what happens next. That's how good it was. I felt like I was inside the book, and a part of Hazel's and Augusts' lives. I experienced and felt everything they were going through. I definitely recommend this book for anyone, whether you read a lot or not at all. Its life changing and I'm already reading another book by him. It was simply amazing.

    - Emily Ann C.



"relatable characters filled with spunk and teenage angst"


John Green's The Fault in Our Stars is about a teenage girl named Hazel Grace Lancaster who was diagnosed at age thirteen with thyroid cancer that has spread to her lungs. Hazel is now sixteen and the hospital has found a fix that works for now, a medicine that shrunk the tumors in her lungs. Hazel falls for a "really, really hot" Augustus Waters who she meets in her support group for her depression, which is "a side effect of dying," not a side effect of cancer. Augustus is a seventeen-year-old amputee who is charismatic who refuses to let cancer define him.

In this romantic tragedy the two star crossed lovers spend short moments of infinites with each other will make you laugh and cry. Both of the characters have terminal cancer, and eventually you have to realize how this story will go. The author adds a mature teenage flare to the two characters, which makes the book delightful to read. Hazel and Augustus are two witty and sarcastic teenagers who can't help but charm the pants off of each other. John Green did an incredible job showing the other side of a child with cancer; although they live with a time limit, Hazel and Augustus are both funny and upbeat throughout their "rollercoaster that only goes up," cancer. The characters are accepting of their fate and are living their lives one day at a time with each other to get the most out of the time restraint put on them. Hazel and Augustus fall in love over misuses of "literally," An Imperial Affliction, refusing to let cancer define them, and Augustus' corny planned picnics.

This novel is a must read, with its relatable characters who are filled with spunk and teenage angst. You can't help but fall in love with Augustus Waters while Hazel does. John Green does an outstanding job with setting the scenery and putting you at the edge of your seat. Anything could happen for these teens, from not being able to take their eyes off of each other in group therapy to a romantic, supervised trip to Germany. The book was very well written; I felt like I really knew the characters and understood fully what they each were going through. Whether they had been blinded, had a limb cut off, weren't able to breathe, or eventually died from disease, I knew how they felt although I may not have experienced the challenges they had. I knew how it felt to have your life cut short. How unfair it was that neither Hazel nor Gus or any other kid with cancer wouldn't be able to become adults or have their own children or even live their own lives.

    - Akeilah M.



"not depressing or full of morbid characters; it has the appropriate amount of humor"


John Green's novel The Fault in Our Stars portrays Hazel Grace Lancaster like any other sixteen year old girl except for one minor difference. She has cancer. We learn when she was thirteen she was diagnosed with stage four thyroid cancer that spread to her lungs. She was taken out of public school and attends classes at a nearby college and her only real friends are her parents, so she's isolated the majority of the time. All of that changes when her mom makes her attend a Cancer Kid Support Group where she meets Augustus Waters. Augustus understands Hazel's situation quite well because he had cancer at one point in his life and lost his leg from it, but he's currently cancer free and healthy. The two quickly become friends and in no time the majority of their time is spent with each other, instead of cooped up in their houses.

Now, the number one, most important thing to know about this book is that it is NOT your typical cancer book. It is not depressing, or full of morbid characters. John Green does a stupendous job of writing a serious novel, but then counteracting it with the appropriate amount of humor. His writing is witty and enticing; the book is fantastic. The Fault in Our Stars was the first book I've read in a while and actually enjoyed. The characters act like any other normal teenagers. They play video games, go to school, hang out with friends, and they develop feelings for other people. The only thing that separates them from other teenagers is their cancer. But Hazel doesn't let her cancer hold her back; it actually makes her stronger and empowers her. She and Augustus both take their cancer as a challenge to live their lives to the fullest and enjoy every moment, while trying not to think about the end. They teach us that life is too short to have worries.

John Green's development of Hazel's character is exquisite. The novel portrays a strong independent girl who has knowledge above her age. She constantly shows she is selfless. Even though she knows she may not live a long life, she cares about the well-being of her parents and Augustus instead of herself. If she dies then yes, that would be a terrible event to happen to her but it would be even more terrible for her parents. Green definitely makes me think about how my death would affect the ones who love me more than myself. If I were a parent and had my one and only child die so young and leave me so early in their lives, I would be grieving for the rest of my life.

Hazel also puts her focus on Augustus. She and Augustus develop feelings for each other, but Hazel is tentative because of what would happen if she died and how it would affect Augustus. She and Gus remain friends for quite some length of the novel but they share a common interest when Hazel tells Gus about her favorite book and they both fall in love with the author and the writing. This leads them on an important journey together.

All in all, The Fault in Our Stars is one of the best books I've read in a while and once I finished it I wanted to read it all over again. Of all of the books John Green has written, this is the deepest one and teaches his readers multiple moral lessons while also having humor and empathy for the characters. I absolutely adore this novel and the writer and recommend this to anyone who has a hard time trying to find a book to get in to.

    - Amanda C.



"There's a fault in your bookshelf if it doesn't have this book.


If you haven't read John Green's most recent novel The Fault in Our Stars, it's safe to say that you're missing out. This wonderfully depressing coming of age tale will take you to places you've never been before.

Hazel Grace Lancaster's lung cancer had thrown her out of a normal teenage life and forced her into one filled with hospital machines and the ever looming possibility of death. Her only friends were her parents and an author whom she had never actually met. But her life faces a drastic shift the day she meets Augustus Waters, a charismatic young cancer survivor and strong believer in metaphors.

John Green takes his readers into a whirlpool of emotions with his ability to turn a scene into a completely different direction on a dime, though the transition seems natural. One moment you will be chuckling aloud at the young teen couple's antics, and the next you'll be holding back tears. One moment you'll feel a deep sense of hope in the world, the next a soul crushing despair. The novel will not take your feelings for granted and you will come out the other end a better person because of it.

John Green has helped young adults in America actually enjoy and anticipate reading novels, due largely to his incredibly authentic dialogue. Really, it's almost concerning how well this 35-year-old man knows the teenaged girl. It's so refreshing to read a book made for young adults that doesn't read like the anti-drug movie they showed you in health class. With dialogue so easy to identify with, you'll be hooked on the book in no less than two chapters.

Going into this book, I had a vague sense of what to expect. Having read all of John Green's previous novels, I thought that I would be able to handle it. I was wrong. Because my grandmother went through cancer, this novel hit home on many different levels. It's the first time I had cried while reading a book since I finished Where the Red Fern Grows in 4th grade. But mixed with the tears was joy, with pain there was happiness.

Though this is a fantastic novel, it's a little frustrating in the sense that the plot line is nearly identical to his other works. This novel is different from John Green's previous books only because it takes life's big questions and shoves them into your face. He forces you to sit down and reconsider all that you know, shows you a different viewpoint upon how to view the world, and then leaves you trying your hardest to just figure it all out.

John Green is often noted for his brilliant climaxes in his books, and his latest does not disappoint. Hazel's world will never be the same after meeting Augustus, and neither will yours. Tears will be shed, love will be lost, yet life will keep going on. The characters in the book are so dynamic and so life-like that you will find it hard not to fall in love with them. At the end of it, I felt as if I had known Augustus and Hazel all of my life, and found myself thinking about them weeks, nay months, after I had completed the book.

There's a fault in your bookshelf if it doesn't have The Fault in our Stars in it. Go buy it today and prepare to not be able to set it down until you've read it through.

    - Chase R.



"To find a book I can enjoy is so refreshing; I never read anything other than what's required of me for school."


The Fault in Our Stars, is a young adult novel written by John Green. Green spent five months working as a student chaplain at a children's hospital. His memories and the interactions with the children with life threatening illnesses inspired him to write the novel.

Hazel Grace is the narrator and head honcho in the novel. She is the sassy spit fire that just happens to have cancer; and thanks to this miracle vaccine her cancer is "under control". However, due to the emotional baggage that cancer brings, she has essentially become numb to all feelings and emotion and always approaches a situation with her eyes wide open. It is not far into this novel when she meets Augustus Waters, a tall, muscular, and handsome young man who is a year older then her.

Augustus also has cancer but is in remission. Once Hazel and Augustus, meet sparks fly. The novel goes through the different stages of a relationship of first becoming friends and then evolving into boyfriend/girlfriend. The novel is centered on this relationship, and Augustus will do anything and everything he can do to make Hazel happy. As a result they travel to see Hazel's favorite author, only to realize that life isn't a wish granting factory-literally.

Even though this is a young adult novel, John Green does not hold back on the maturity of context and vocabulary. There's an even balance between dramatic action and somber conversation. The maturity of vocabulary is almost essential into order accurately bring these characters to life. Hazel is a 16 year old who hasn't been to a public school years but still has her GED and now attends community college. Hazel has a different view of the world, making her analyzes every word that anyone ever says. Augustus is also rather smart. However, he is more filled with emotion and loves to use adjectives and insists on talking, whereas Hazel is the complete opposite.

Personally I loved this book. Also, I never read anything other than what's required of me for school. So for me to find a book that I enjoy and can follow easily is so refreshing. I also loved this book because it can easily be related to a real life scenario; unlike many other young adult books that are often about weird kids with super powers. Even though the topic of cancer can be read by a boy or a girl; girls like books that follow a love story; so I loved that this novel carried this hard topic of cancer underneath such a fragile and gentle love story.

The only issue that I did have with the book is I wished that there was not the period of time where Augustus like Hazel but Hazel did not like Augustus; so therefore, there was this circle effect that went on and it made me kind of bored at times. However, I understand why John Green added because it made the novel more believable and not a typical fairy tale. However Green did try to make a fairy tale happen even in the face of despair, hopelessness, and frightfulness. This novel was fabulous and made me interested in the topic of cancer but still kept me entertained with the personal relationships happening underneath all the hub bub.

Overall this was an excellent novel and I loved it, because of the realistic plot line and because the style of writing was easily understandable but not so easy that it made the story boring.

    - Katie R.